Painting ++ Robotic Painting ++ Printmaking ++ Drawing

Variations on Gestural Computer-Generated Brushstrokes. Six worImpression from Grayvers solo exhibition “Pinselstriche im digitalen Zeitalter Interdisziplinäre Forschung in Malerei & Robotik” at Halle 14, Spinnerei Leipzig in February 2017. Photo : Marcus Nebe. ks, 40 x 60 each
Variations on Gestural Computer-Generated Brushstrokes. Six worImpression from Liat Grayver’s solo exhibition “Pinselstriche im digitalen Zeitalter: Interdisziplinäre Forschung in Malerei & Robotik” at Halle 14, Spinnerei Leipzig in February 2017. Photo: Marcus Nebe.

 

 

Biography

Liat Grayver (Israel 1986) has graduated in 2015 from the Art Academy of Leipzig (MFA painting, class of Heribert. C. Ottersbach), and she is currently a post-graduate in the class of Joachim Blank (Media Art) and parallel at the class of Heribert C. Ottersbach (painting) HGB Leipzig. Since January 2016, Grayver has been collaborating with the University of Konstanz on the e-David Project, exploring various approaches to integrate robotic and computer languages in the processes of painting and creative image-making.

Grayver’s academic education has been complemented by a range of studies with artists of renown, as well as by several artist residencies. For example, in 2013–14, she was an Erasmus student at the Accademia di Belle Arti (Napoli, Italy), and during the summer of 2014, she studied printmaking under Mary Beth MacKenzie at the Art Student League (New York City). From 2010–13. She attended the Shiboku Studio (Haifa, Israel) in 2008–09 to study Japanese calligraphy under Kazou Ishii, and from 2005–07 she was a student in the Master Class of Israel Hershberg at the Jerusalem Studio School of Painting and Drawing (Israel).

Grayver’s professional experiences extend to teaching and giving workshop and lectures in various institutions, among others, ELES Kunstlab Berlin and  University of Konstanz in Germany, and at MIT (Cambridge, USA).
Various institutions, including ELES Studienwerk, Leonardo scholarship and the DAAD, have supported Grayver’s work and studies. Her works have been exhibited in galleries, art fairs and museums. Since 2014, Liat  Gravyer is based in Berlin and working in Berlin, Leipzig, Konstanz and Tel Aviv.

 

Artist Statement

The whole of artistic activity can be described as an instance of self-regulation. Order in painting is traditionally achieved through the self-regulation of the painter and by external intervention. It is necessary to distinguish between — and balance — those characteristics relevant to the realm of individual artistic perception and that which is external to the artist’s motives, intentions and preferences.Print-making drawing, painting, photography, generated data and robotic technologies are tools used in my artistic practice to explore, retain and express visual information in relation to the digital and machine-based world we live in today. My work explores the different ways the body and mind perceive not only the visual objects themselves (such as painting), but also the process through which they are created — what is seen as a whole (form) and what is felt as energy (vector).

During the working process, passive materials (canvas, paper, wood surfaces, etc.) react to my active manipulation of materials upon them; both the passive and active elements are equally and reciprocally important to the process as well as to the finished work. Using and mixing different media in one work creates a rich context in which I explore the tension between marks that are made with body gestures and those made with different degrees of technological intervention. A work may consist of, for example, human and robotic brushstrokes, prints, photopolymer of digital painting and photographs on unmounted canvas.

Making art for me is the attempt to manifest one’s own intimate biography through materials into the public and social discourse. This is not only about the form or the finished object, but rather about the process, the perspective and perception of a structure — all of which is defined by our dynamic surroundings, and contemplated through the tools, mediums, and technology of the present time and local place.Putting a mark of paint on a surface is an intuitive gesture that holds within it the intention of the work more than it represents the finished image. The finished work narrows down visual information to its essential gestures and primordial symbolism, exploring collective perception, producing and communicating classical and local iconographic characters encountered in the visual and literary domain.

Selected Works

photograp of a splash of paint printed with Photopolymer on rice paper, oil painting and colore  pencils on canvas
photograp of a splash of paint printed with Photopolymer on rice paper, oil painting and colore pencils on canvas
Left; Simulation of an oil paint roller painting with "Artrage".  Center; Photopolymer-Print of the simulated oil paint.  Right; Dry-Point and Photopolymer-Print on rice paper mounted on Canvas, painted over with Oil paint.
Left; Simulation of an oil paint roller painting with „Artrage“.
Center; Photopolymer-Print of the simulated oil paint.
Right; Dry-Point and Photopolymer-Print on rice paper mounted on Canvas, painted over with Oil paint.
Robotic painting, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 80 cm,
Robotic painting, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 80 cm,
Random-generated robotic brushstrokes using intuitively chosen and manually installed paint colours, and hand-applied splattered paint drops, glaze and gestural brushstrokes. Acrylic on paper, 90 x 60 cm,
Random-generated robotic brushstrokes using intuitively chosen and manually installed paint colours, and hand-applied splattered paint drops, glaze and gestural brushstrokes. Acrylic on paper, 90 x 60 cm,
Digital photo, photopolymer on rice paper, dry-point, charcoal and oil paint brushstrokes, 200 x 150 cm
Digital photo, photopolymer on rice paper, dry-point, charcoal and oil paint brushstrokes, 200 x 150 cm
Photograph of a splash of paint printed using photopolymer on rice paper, mounted on a photopolymer print of dry soil on cotton paper, and direct ink drawing,
Photograph of a splash of paint printed using photopolymer on rice paper, mounted on a photopolymer print of dry soil on cotton paper, and direct ink drawing,

Brushstrokes in the Digital Age,   Interdisciplinary research in painting and robotics. e-David Painting Robot, University of Konstanz.